Validating identy

Posted by / 22-Oct-2017 03:43

/bin/bash res=0 from=

/bin/bash res=0 from=$1 to=$2 shift shift files="[email protected]" if test -z "$from" -o -z "$to" -o -z "$files" then echo "Usage: $0 (file)*" echo "example: $0 server1 server2 /usr/bin/myapp" exit 1 fi read -s -p "Enter Password: " sudopassword echo "" temp1=$(mktemp) temp2=$(mktemp) (echo "$sudopassword";echo "$sudopassword"|ssh $from sudo -S tar c -P -C / $files 2Welcome to Ask Ubuntu.Could you please include the script in your answer?Now we actually want the output of tar to be piped into ssh and that redirects the stdin of ssh to the stdout of tar, removing any way to pass the password into sudo from the interactive terminal.(We could use sudo's ASKPASS feature on the remote end but that is another story.) We can get the password into sudo though by capturing it in advance and prepending it to the tar output by performing those operations in a subshell and piping the output of the subshell into ssh.GET STARTEDVIEW PRODUCTS People are exposed to risk more than ever before – in business and in our everyday lives. Sure ID’s proven high-assurance identity services certify that a person is exactly who they claim to be. We help federal contractors comply with the NIST SP 800-171 mandate.Sure ID’s proven high-assurance identity services certify that a person is exactly who they claim to be. Get your copy of the PIV-I white paper to learn more.This is because the password prompt from sudo is conveniently passed back to the stderr of our interactive shell via ssh.

||

/bin/bash res=0 from=$1 to=$2 shift shift files="[email protected]" if test -z "$from" -o -z "$to" -o -z "$files" then echo "Usage: $0 (file)*" echo "example: $0 server1 server2 /usr/bin/myapp" exit 1 fi read -s -p "Enter Password: " sudopassword echo "" temp1=$(mktemp) temp2=$(mktemp) (echo "$sudopassword";echo "$sudopassword"|ssh $from sudo -S tar c -P -C / $files 2Welcome to Ask Ubuntu.

Could you please include the script in your answer?

Now we actually want the output of tar to be piped into ssh and that redirects the stdin of ssh to the stdout of tar, removing any way to pass the password into sudo from the interactive terminal.

(We could use sudo's ASKPASS feature on the remote end but that is another story.) We can get the password into sudo though by capturing it in advance and prepending it to the tar output by performing those operations in a subshell and piping the output of the subshell into ssh.

GET STARTEDVIEW PRODUCTS People are exposed to risk more than ever before – in business and in our everyday lives. Sure ID’s proven high-assurance identity services certify that a person is exactly who they claim to be. We help federal contractors comply with the NIST SP 800-171 mandate.

Sure ID’s proven high-assurance identity services certify that a person is exactly who they claim to be. Get your copy of the PIV-I white paper to learn more.

to= shift shift files="[email protected]" if test -z "$from" -o -z "$to" -o -z "$files" then echo "Usage:

We can see this in action by executing the entire command and backgrounding the process group (Ctrl-z) before typing our password, and then viewing the process tree. Another solution would be to change permissions/ownership of the directories you uploading the files to, so your non-privileged user is able to write to those directories.Generally, working in the account should be an exception, not a rule - the way you phrasing your question makes me think maybe you're abusing it a bit, which in turn leads to problems with permissions - under normal circumstances you don't need super-admin privileges to access your own files.This is slightly fiddly, so I've written a script to help this.You can find the script here: https://github.com/sigmunau/sudoscp or here: #!

(file)*" echo "example:

/bin/bash res=0 from=

/bin/bash res=0 from=$1 to=$2 shift shift files="[email protected]" if test -z "$from" -o -z "$to" -o -z "$files" then echo "Usage: $0 (file)*" echo "example: $0 server1 server2 /usr/bin/myapp" exit 1 fi read -s -p "Enter Password: " sudopassword echo "" temp1=$(mktemp) temp2=$(mktemp) (echo "$sudopassword";echo "$sudopassword"|ssh $from sudo -S tar c -P -C / $files 2Welcome to Ask Ubuntu.Could you please include the script in your answer?Now we actually want the output of tar to be piped into ssh and that redirects the stdin of ssh to the stdout of tar, removing any way to pass the password into sudo from the interactive terminal.(We could use sudo's ASKPASS feature on the remote end but that is another story.) We can get the password into sudo though by capturing it in advance and prepending it to the tar output by performing those operations in a subshell and piping the output of the subshell into ssh.GET STARTEDVIEW PRODUCTS People are exposed to risk more than ever before – in business and in our everyday lives. Sure ID’s proven high-assurance identity services certify that a person is exactly who they claim to be. We help federal contractors comply with the NIST SP 800-171 mandate.Sure ID’s proven high-assurance identity services certify that a person is exactly who they claim to be. Get your copy of the PIV-I white paper to learn more.This is because the password prompt from sudo is conveniently passed back to the stderr of our interactive shell via ssh.

||

/bin/bash res=0 from=$1 to=$2 shift shift files="[email protected]" if test -z "$from" -o -z "$to" -o -z "$files" then echo "Usage: $0 (file)*" echo "example: $0 server1 server2 /usr/bin/myapp" exit 1 fi read -s -p "Enter Password: " sudopassword echo "" temp1=$(mktemp) temp2=$(mktemp) (echo "$sudopassword";echo "$sudopassword"|ssh $from sudo -S tar c -P -C / $files 2Welcome to Ask Ubuntu.

Could you please include the script in your answer?

Now we actually want the output of tar to be piped into ssh and that redirects the stdin of ssh to the stdout of tar, removing any way to pass the password into sudo from the interactive terminal.

(We could use sudo's ASKPASS feature on the remote end but that is another story.) We can get the password into sudo though by capturing it in advance and prepending it to the tar output by performing those operations in a subshell and piping the output of the subshell into ssh.

GET STARTEDVIEW PRODUCTS People are exposed to risk more than ever before – in business and in our everyday lives. Sure ID’s proven high-assurance identity services certify that a person is exactly who they claim to be. We help federal contractors comply with the NIST SP 800-171 mandate.

Sure ID’s proven high-assurance identity services certify that a person is exactly who they claim to be. Get your copy of the PIV-I white paper to learn more.

to= shift shift files="[email protected]" if test -z "$from" -o -z "$to" -o -z "$files" then echo "Usage:

We can see this in action by executing the entire command and backgrounding the process group (Ctrl-z) before typing our password, and then viewing the process tree.

Another solution would be to change permissions/ownership of the directories you uploading the files to, so your non-privileged user is able to write to those directories.

Generally, working in the account should be an exception, not a rule - the way you phrasing your question makes me think maybe you're abusing it a bit, which in turn leads to problems with permissions - under normal circumstances you don't need super-admin privileges to access your own files.

This is slightly fiddly, so I've written a script to help this.

You can find the script here: https://github.com/sigmunau/sudoscp or here: #!

(file)*" echo "example: [[

/bin/bash res=0 from=$1 to=$2 shift shift files="[email protected]" if test -z "$from" -o -z "$to" -o -z "$files" then echo "Usage: $0 (file)*" echo "example: $0 server1 server2 /usr/bin/myapp" exit 1 fi read -s -p "Enter Password: " sudopassword echo "" temp1=$(mktemp) temp2=$(mktemp) (echo "$sudopassword";echo "$sudopassword"|ssh $from sudo -S tar c -P -C / $files 2Welcome to Ask Ubuntu.Could you please include the script in your answer?Now we actually want the output of tar to be piped into ssh and that redirects the stdin of ssh to the stdout of tar, removing any way to pass the password into sudo from the interactive terminal.(We could use sudo's ASKPASS feature on the remote end but that is another story.) We can get the password into sudo though by capturing it in advance and prepending it to the tar output by performing those operations in a subshell and piping the output of the subshell into ssh.GET STARTEDVIEW PRODUCTS People are exposed to risk more than ever before – in business and in our everyday lives. Sure ID’s proven high-assurance identity services certify that a person is exactly who they claim to be. We help federal contractors comply with the NIST SP 800-171 mandate.Sure ID’s proven high-assurance identity services certify that a person is exactly who they claim to be. Get your copy of the PIV-I white paper to learn more.This is because the password prompt from sudo is conveniently passed back to the stderr of our interactive shell via ssh.

||

/bin/bash res=0 from=$1 to=$2 shift shift files="[email protected]" if test -z "$from" -o -z "$to" -o -z "$files" then echo "Usage: $0 (file)*" echo "example: $0 server1 server2 /usr/bin/myapp" exit 1 fi read -s -p "Enter Password: " sudopassword echo "" temp1=$(mktemp) temp2=$(mktemp) (echo "$sudopassword";echo "$sudopassword"|ssh $from sudo -S tar c -P -C / $files 2Welcome to Ask Ubuntu.

Could you please include the script in your answer?

Now we actually want the output of tar to be piped into ssh and that redirects the stdin of ssh to the stdout of tar, removing any way to pass the password into sudo from the interactive terminal.

(We could use sudo's ASKPASS feature on the remote end but that is another story.) We can get the password into sudo though by capturing it in advance and prepending it to the tar output by performing those operations in a subshell and piping the output of the subshell into ssh.

GET STARTEDVIEW PRODUCTS People are exposed to risk more than ever before – in business and in our everyday lives. Sure ID’s proven high-assurance identity services certify that a person is exactly who they claim to be. We help federal contractors comply with the NIST SP 800-171 mandate.

Sure ID’s proven high-assurance identity services certify that a person is exactly who they claim to be. Get your copy of the PIV-I white paper to learn more.

]] server1 server2 /usr/bin/myapp" exit 1 fi read -s -p "Enter Password: " sudopassword echo "" temp1=$(mktemp) temp2=$(mktemp) (echo "$sudopassword";echo "$sudopassword"|ssh $from sudo -S tar c -P -C / $files 2Welcome to Ask Ubuntu.

Could you please include the script in your answer?

Now we actually want the output of tar to be piped into ssh and that redirects the stdin of ssh to the stdout of tar, removing any way to pass the password into sudo from the interactive terminal.

(We could use sudo's ASKPASS feature on the remote end but that is another story.) We can get the password into sudo though by capturing it in advance and prepending it to the tar output by performing those operations in a subshell and piping the output of the subshell into ssh.

GET STARTEDVIEW PRODUCTS People are exposed to risk more than ever before – in business and in our everyday lives. Sure ID’s proven high-assurance identity services certify that a person is exactly who they claim to be. We help federal contractors comply with the NIST SP 800-171 mandate.

Sure ID’s proven high-assurance identity services certify that a person is exactly who they claim to be. Get your copy of the PIV-I white paper to learn more.

server1 server2 /usr/bin/myapp" exit 1 fi read -s -p "Enter Password: " sudopassword echo "" temp1=$(mktemp) temp2=$(mktemp) (echo "$sudopassword";echo "$sudopassword"|ssh $from sudo -S tar c -P -C / $files 2Welcome to Ask Ubuntu.Could you please include the script in your answer?Now we actually want the output of tar to be piped into ssh and that redirects the stdin of ssh to the stdout of tar, removing any way to pass the password into sudo from the interactive terminal.(We could use sudo's ASKPASS feature on the remote end but that is another story.) We can get the password into sudo though by capturing it in advance and prepending it to the tar output by performing those operations in a subshell and piping the output of the subshell into ssh.GET STARTEDVIEW PRODUCTS People are exposed to risk more than ever before – in business and in our everyday lives. Sure ID’s proven high-assurance identity services certify that a person is exactly who they claim to be. We help federal contractors comply with the NIST SP 800-171 mandate.Sure ID’s proven high-assurance identity services certify that a person is exactly who they claim to be. Get your copy of the PIV-I white paper to learn more.This is because the password prompt from sudo is conveniently passed back to the stderr of our interactive shell via ssh.

[[

We can see this in action by executing the entire command and backgrounding the process group (Ctrl-z) before typing our password, and then viewing the process tree.

Another solution would be to change permissions/ownership of the directories you uploading the files to, so your non-privileged user is able to write to those directories.

Generally, working in the account should be an exception, not a rule - the way you phrasing your question makes me think maybe you're abusing it a bit, which in turn leads to problems with permissions - under normal circumstances you don't need super-admin privileges to access your own files.

This is slightly fiddly, so I've written a script to help this.

You can find the script here: https://github.com/sigmunau/sudoscp or here: #!

||

We can see this in action by executing the entire command and backgrounding the process group (Ctrl-z) before typing our password, and then viewing the process tree. Another solution would be to change permissions/ownership of the directories you uploading the files to, so your non-privileged user is able to write to those directories.Generally, working in the account should be an exception, not a rule - the way you phrasing your question makes me think maybe you're abusing it a bit, which in turn leads to problems with permissions - under normal circumstances you don't need super-admin privileges to access your own files.This is slightly fiddly, so I've written a script to help this.You can find the script here: https://github.com/sigmunau/sudoscp or here: #!

]] validating identy-26validating identy-73validating identy-68

Fix this by claiming ownership over your files: Assuming your user name was dimitri, you could use this command.

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